Cultivar: Mary Woodbury Shaylor

 
Mary Woodbury Shaylor
Acquired: 1924

1918-B006-I:16 1921-B014:16 Symposium II rating: 9.4 1923-SPN:348 1928-B:44 Double. 9.0 (Sym. 1925). Flesh-white. 1928-B-d:120 Double type; very large; late midseason. Guards cupped and... Read more

Cultivar Group: Paeonia lactiflora
Introduced: 1916
Breeder: Shaylor
Country of Origin: USA
Form: Double
Color - Authentic: white

Updated February 9, 2016

 
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This cultivar is owned by
Nichols Arboretum
 

Incidences of this Cultivar Around the World

Accession Numbersort descending Found At Currently Present Last Verified
13926 Nichols Arboretum yes
13927 Nichols Arboretum yes

Incidences of this Cultivar Around the World

Accession Numbersort descending Found At
13926 Nichols Arboretum
13927 Nichols Arboretum
Historical Significance:

1918-B006-I:16

1921-B014:16 Symposium II rating: 9.4

1923-SPN:348

1928-B:44 Double. 9.0 (Sym. 1925). Flesh-white.

1928-B-d:120 Double type; very large; late midseason. Guards cupped and rounded, surrounding a collar of shredded petals and stamens and a deep symmetrical center of long, narrow petals with a few rose-like stamens; pale flesh-white, illumined by golden reflections from the stamens and marked with strong crimson blotches on a few short petals in the collar; fragrant but not sweet. Dwarf; very floriferous; stems stiff. Foliage broad and abundant. Occasionally pinker than described. Its fault is the ragged collar in which the stamens blacken early. This defect is concealed in the later development of the flower. "Flowers on the original seedling plant stood about 3 feet high and were very beautiful. The foliage of the plant was very remarkable, the divisions of the leaves the broadest ever observed by me in any variety. It has been badly stunted by excessive propagation and probably will require several years of good cultivation to bring it back to its original perfection."—Fewke.

1976-K:061 (Shaylor, 1916) - Double - Flesh - Late Midseason. Dwarf. Fragrant but not sweet. Very large. Guards cupped and rounded, surrounding a collar of shredded petals and stamens and a deep symmetrical center of long, narrow petals with a few rose-like stamens; pale flesh-white, illumined by golden reflections from the stamens and marked with strong crimson blotches on a few short petals in the collar. Very floriferous; stems stiff, foliage broad and abundant. M.

Historical Color:

1918-B006-I:16

1921-B014:16 Symposium II rating: 9.4

1923-SPN:348

1928-B:44 Double. 9.0 (Sym. 1925). Flesh-white.

1928-B-d:120 Double type; very large; late midseason. Guards cupped and rounded, surrounding a collar of shredded petals and stamens and a deep symmetrical center of long, narrow petals with a few rose-like stamens; pale flesh-white, illumined by golden reflections from the stamens and marked with strong crimson blotches on a few short petals in the collar; fragrant but not sweet. Dwarf; very floriferous; stems stiff. Foliage broad and abundant. Occasionally pinker than described. Its fault is the ragged collar in which the stamens blacken early. This defect is concealed in the later development of the flower. "Flowers on the original seedling plant stood about 3 feet high and were very beautiful. The foliage of the plant was very remarkable, the divisions of the leaves the broadest ever observed by me in any variety. It has been badly stunted by excessive propagation and probably will require several years of good cultivation to bring it back to its original perfection."—Fewke.

1976-K:061 (Shaylor, 1916) - Double - Flesh - Late Midseason. Dwarf. Fragrant but not sweet. Very large. Guards cupped and rounded, surrounding a collar of shredded petals and stamens and a deep symmetrical center of long, narrow petals with a few rose-like stamens; pale flesh-white, illumined by golden reflections from the stamens and marked with strong crimson blotches on a few short petals in the collar. Very floriferous; stems stiff, foliage broad and abundant. M.

Scent - Historical:

No Information

Historic information about this cultivar includes published information courtesy of the American Peony Society.

 

Codebreaking

What is 1928-B:68?  Learn more about the 'funny numbers and letters' as keys to historic references.
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History of the Garden

In 1922 the Regents of the University of Michigan appropriated $2,000 to establish the Peony Garden at the Nichols Arboretum.
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